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Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:07 pm
by Rasann
I was wondering if it was possible to combine an Alloy, such a steel, with a mineral/crystal resource such as Obsidian? I ask because in the RPG game I'm currently playing in, my character has what we have called "Dragonsteel" which is obsidian combined with steel to give it more unique properties.

I'm not sure what is the standing on it so I'd ask, I'm trying to figure out what resource(s) would stand out on my world (Falasine) but I was thinking perhaps being so heavily enriched with minerals etc...perhaps the locals have found a way to combine such an alloy with another material

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:00 pm
by ShortenWeaponry
I think it's not that hard. If You can have high carbon japanese steel, why wouldn't you combine obsydian with steel. Funny thing obsidian is mainly mainly alloy of iron :D
Sorry for my english It's late here and I'm sleepy :D

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:07 pm
by Rasann
thanks :D - that helps a lot :D

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2012 6:35 pm
by Talusmouse
I don't know about your planet but Gundam Wing had a pretty plausible idea for "Special Metals" The Gundiaum Alloy from the series came from materials on floating asteroids that were melted together by the sun's heat. As long as their is some sort of reaction from temperatures or chemicals you could right up an material you so desire.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:07 pm
by Foxfire
Talusmouse wrote:I don't know about your planet but Gundam Wing had a pretty plausible idea for "Special Metals" The Gundiaum Alloy from the series came from materials on floating asteroids that were melted together by the sun's heat. As long as their is some sort of reaction from temperatures or chemicals you could right up an material you so desire.


There is also the zero-g efect. Some composite structures and alloys can only be formed in a zero g environment.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 1:13 am
by Rasann
Got some ideas rolling in my frontal lobe here. Thanks :)

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:30 am
by Wordman
Googling for "alloy metal and glass" yields amorphous metal as its first hit.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 1:16 am
by Rasann
thanks, I'll look it up

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 1:57 pm
by A YATES INDUSTRIALS
one of my materials is 'Foamed-Aluminum Silklyte' . . Silklyte is spider silk woven with Nylar ..Nylar is nylon and kevlar micro-strands. Foamed Aluminum is aluminum that is elctro-heated causing it to foam.
It is then sprayed over Silklyte panels when cured it creates a lightweight flexible armor.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:10 pm
by Joshua A.C. Newman
Alloys are metals combined with other materials. Steel is iron and carbon. Bronze is copper and silicon. Titanium is usually actually titanium and iron.

Obsidian is a glass; that is, a silicate. Could you make an iron/silicon alloy? I don't know! Let's ask the Internet!

You can! It's sure not a mighty industrial steel, though.

So, you want something amazingly flexible? Or you want a material that's super hard? Those are usually in opposition; speaking of Japanese steel, part of what makes it work (as well as some really neato Viking steel) is case hardening: that is, the edge (which has to be hard to keep an edge) is allowed to cool slowly (making coherent, rigid, well-formed crystals) while the rest of the blade is cooled quickly (making half-formed, flexible, amorphous crystals). Voilá! Hard and flexible!

Titanium's neatotude comes from its extraordinarily high modulus of flexibility; that is, many alloys can be bent waaaay out of shape before they will stop snapping back. It's not very hard, though; it's resistant to cutting because it has very low heat conductivity, which makes it sticky at high heat. It's also flammable, which is pretty exciting.

Where the real action is at is with composite materials; that is, materials with different characteristics bonded together on a macroscopic level. Carbon fiber, fiberglass, bamboo fiber, and other such materials work well because you put the fibers in the direction where they work the best (oddly, in compression most of the time) and then hold them in place by soaking them with a resin that keeps them from delaminating when they flex. You can then cover those with a piece of, say, titanium (flexy) and ceramic scales (hard and with a high specific heat) to get a hard, flexible, heat-resistant plate.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 1:50 pm
by Foxfire
Just a quick nitpicky thing. Bronze is usually copper and tin.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:33 pm
by Joshua A.C. Newman
Yeah, or tin, or lots of other things that are considered bronze. Historically, it's meant a lot of copper alloys. It's not like there were ancient standards boards for this kind of thing.

By contrast, modern brass is copper with zinc and I don't know any other meanings for it.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:46 am
by Foxfire
Joshua A.C. Newman wrote:Yeah, or tin, or lots of other things that are considered bronze. Historically, it's meant a lot of copper alloys. It's not like there were ancient standards boards for this kind of thing.

By contrast, modern brass is copper with zinc and I don't know any other meanings for it.


Yeah, I had to look it up to be sure, that is when I found out bronze is usually made with tin, but not always.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 2:46 pm
by Joshua A.C. Newman
Oh, brass is sometimes made with lead, but then it's called "leaded brass". It cuts really evenly because of the smooth, lubricating effect of the lead, which then makes your children stupid.

Re: Alloys Combined with other materials

PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 3:50 pm
by Rasann
Thanks! :D