Running Food Thread

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Running Food Thread

Postby Soren » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:35 pm

Because I can't not talk about the delicious things I put in my mouth, and it's better if I/we compile those digressions into a giant list of culinary awesomeness.

Pippi Shortstack wrote:
Soren wrote:This is pulled pork. It is delicious (I'm partial to a mustard sauce, myself).


I kinda like a smoky BBQ myself. But yeah, made right, pulled pork is a SUPER yummy sammich filling. And, as far as I know, there's no long pig involved.


If you can, get your hands on a jar of chili honey and try that with some diced shallots and your favorite hot mustard. It cooks up into a fantastic sauce for pulled pork, chicken kebabs, you name it.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Red_Robot » Tue Apr 01, 2014 12:52 am

Ah...Barbecue...my last remaining religion.

I must admit pulled pork is a big favorite of mine, as opposed to chopped pork which is more of an eastern seaboard traditional style. I like the stringy texture more. And growing up within a couple hours drive of Memphis my preference is more for the thin vinegar and tomato paste style sauces prevalent in the Tennessee area. Vinegar and mustard sauces are a great alternative though, especially if you need to watch your sugar intake.

Pulled pork also makes a great taco or burrito filling in lieu of carnitas. Carnitas are a whole other salivary excursion.

Unfortunately, we've had about six months of winter around here and I haven't fired up the smoker even once this year. It makes me sad.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby XGundam05 » Tue Apr 01, 2014 1:49 am

Y'all are making me hungry >.> Pulled Pork and Sweet Tea comprise the fixins of one of my all-time favorite meals. Good Sweet Tea mind you, just this side of gritty, and strong.

Also, soft flour tortillas and anything you'd normally put on bread. PB&H in a tortilla? Amazing. Creamed Chicken? Yup. A cheeseburger? Indeed. (We often have more tortillas than bread...hence the anything + tortillas)

And, while this has wierded out most people I know, Doritos (not nacho cheese) and Peanut Butter.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby MittenNinja » Tue Apr 01, 2014 2:33 am

Peanut butter grilled cheese sandwich. Do not knock it until you try it.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Zero Revenge » Tue Apr 01, 2014 11:10 am

Pulled Pork + Taylor Ham [or Pork Roll] sandwich is the modern-day ambrosia.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby XGundam05 » Tue Apr 01, 2014 9:14 pm

MittenNinja wrote:Peanut butter grilled cheese sandwich. Do not knock it until you try it.

My curiosity has been piqued good sir. Would I be correct to assume it's built something like bread=>pb=>cheese=>bread?
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby MittenNinja » Tue Apr 01, 2014 9:36 pm

XGundam05 wrote:
MittenNinja wrote:Peanut butter grilled cheese sandwich. Do not knock it until you try it.

My curiosity has been piqued good sir. Would I be correct to assume it's built something like bread=>pb=>cheese=>bread?

Yessir. The PB melts into the cheese and creates a gooey cheesy peanut buttery goodness.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby spacemonkey » Sat Apr 26, 2014 1:59 pm

Just stumbled on this video: LEGO Pinata Cookies

LEGO + Cookies = Awesome! :D
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby soriansj » Fri May 02, 2014 12:24 am

MittenNinja wrote:
XGundam05 wrote:
MittenNinja wrote:Peanut butter grilled cheese sandwich. Do not knock it until you try it.

My curiosity has been piqued good sir. Would I be correct to assume it's built something like bread=>pb=>cheese=>bread?

Yessir. The PB melts into the cheese and creates a gooey cheesy peanut buttery goodness.


So, its basically carbs with more carbs, sandwiched by yet more carbs. I feel my blood glucose skyrocket... still, I think I will try some too.

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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby CADmonkey » Fri May 02, 2014 10:18 am

soriansj wrote:So, its basically carbs with more carbs, sandwiched by yet more carbs. I feel my blood glucose skyrocket... still, I think I will try some too.

On average, peanut butter is 20% carbs and cheese is less than 5% carbs. Fat is the biggest element in both, with protein a distant second. :geek:
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby mraichelson » Fri May 02, 2014 3:16 pm

Who wants candy?

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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Mantisking » Fri May 02, 2014 3:27 pm

mraichelson wrote:Who wants candy?

I love those things.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby The Bane » Fri May 02, 2014 4:01 pm

Holy crud... eat your opponent's Frames when you blow them to bits equals win/win!!!

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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby mraichelson » Fri May 02, 2014 4:31 pm

The Bane wrote:Holy crud... eat your opponent's Frames when you blow them to bits equals win/win!!!


This is an idea I can get behind. "I fire on your artillery frame and...*chomps off head*...success!"
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Mantisking » Sun May 25, 2014 10:39 pm

We went out for dinner tonight. We had Korean Fried Chicken and Pickled Daikon, among other things.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby addking » Mon May 26, 2014 12:20 am

mraichelson wrote:Who wants candy?

Image


Sweet terrain. *ba-dum, tish*
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Red_Robot » Mon May 26, 2014 4:14 am

Summer is here at last, (at least for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere) and my thoughts turn to the fancy of my last remaining religion: Barbecue. The thing I find fascinating about barbecue is it is a fiercely regional art, and aficionados can get into serious debate over technique and ingredients.

I promised a pulled pork recipe a while back, but then I got lost in internal debate. This isn't exactly a cooking forum, and I wasn't sure about the level of technique that would be appreciated or wanted. If I got into debate over brines or woodchips I'm sure most people's eyes would glaze over.

So I opted to share a good beginners recipe. It's an excellent jumping off point, and is very forgiving. And the end result is tender and has a hint of sweetness.

Crock Pot Pulled Pork

What you are going to need:

  • 4-5 lbs Boston Butt Pork Roast
  • 1 can Ginger Ale
  • 1/2 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Liquid Smoke
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Garlic Powder
  • Onion Powder
  • Ground Mustard
  • Paprika
  • 1 Large White, Yellow or Vidalia Onion
  • 1 meat injection syringe*
  • Sauce of your choice, either homemade or store bought.

You are also going to need a 4-6 quart crock pot or a good deep roasting pan if you are going the oven route.

Prep Time: 20-60 minutes
Cook Time: 6-12 hours

First take your butt roast, and give it a good rinse, then set it aside in a shallow pan or on a large plate where you have workspace to handle it. You can go bone-in or boneless with your butt. Boneless is a little easier to handle at the end point of our journey, but I prefer bone-in because it has a little more collagen and the bone adds flavor.

Now take your dry ingredients and dust them over your butt roast on all sides, in the order listed individually: salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, ground mustard, and paprika. Give the meat a good pat and let the spices stick. Love comes from the hands. Now let your roast sit for a bit while you play with your ingredients. If you really want to take things seriously, apply your dry rub and let the roast sit for about an hour in the fridge so the spices can set up and get a good adhesion to the wet meat.

Now take your wet and dry ingredients (except for the onion) and combine them in a mixing bowl. Add about a teaspoon each of the dry spices and whisk them into the liquid, and let them sit for a bit. We will be using this liquid for both our cooking liquid and our injection.

Now let's take our onion and slice it into about half inch slabs. At this point I would sprinkle a pinch of salt and pepper on each side of each onion slab and brown them in a skillet with a little olive oil. But it isn't necessary. Line the bottom of your crockpot with the onions to make a bed for the roast, and reserve about 1/2 to 1/3rd to put on top.

Now give our liquid a good whisk. Reserve about half a cup and tuck it away in the fridge. Now fill your injection syringe. You want about 6 good injection sights around the roast at a medium depth. You don't have to go crazy, to the point juice is squirting out of your roast. Just inject until there is a visible plumping.

Now place your roast in the pot and add your cooking liquid and top with the remainder of your onions. If you are using an oven instead of a crockpot, just do the same with your roasting pan. Put on your lid and you're good to go.

Now the secret to good pulled pork is the First Commandment of Barbecue: Low and Slow. If using a crock pot, set it on low and let it cook for about 10-12 hours. If cooking in the oven, set the temperature to about 250 degrees and let it go for about 8. If you don't have the luxury of time, you can set your crock pot on high and cut the cook time down to about 5-6 hours. Slow cooking is what you want though, because that gives the roast ample time for the lipids and collagen to melt and make the meat loose and tender. Depending on your individual equipment cook times may vary a little. The other rule is Don't Fiddle With It. No matter how tempting, don't keep lifting the lid and poking at it. This only extends the cooking time.

At around the end of your cooking time, (10th-11th hour) check to see if your roast is getting fork tender. At this point, remove your roast and let it rest enough to work with it. Discard your cooking liquid, then shred the roast with forks, removing the bone and any excess fat or tendons. When you are left with a nice stringy pile of meat, return it to the crock pot. You can add your cooked onions back to the meat at this point, or discard them according to personal taste. Remember that half cup of liquid we reserved? Add this back to the meat along with whatever type of sauce you like and let it simmer low and slow. If you are roasting in the oven, then place your pork in a 3 quart stock pot on the stove on low heat and add your liquid and sauce.

At this point, all you need is bread for a fine sandwich. I like it topped with a nice vinegary cole slaw, but again that gets into regional debate.

A quick and easy variation on this recipe is to simply change up the type of soda pop you use. I like to use Dr. Pepper or Cherry Crush. Another (obvious) variation is to use your favorite beer.

Another quick switch-out that really changes the taste profile is something I call Bloody Boston Butt. Instead of the above ingredients, you use...

  • 3 cups Bloody Mary Mix
  • 1 Bottle of Beer
  • 1 cup Smoked Ham Broth
  • 2 tablespoons Minced Garlic
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Celery Salt
  • 1 medium Onion
  • 1 green Bell Pepper
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper

You combine your liquid and reserve about half for the end simmering process. Otherwise, same technique, different ingredients. Also, this makes a bit more liquid so you want to use a 6 quart crock pot to avoid a counter top flood. This also makes a good quick-and-dirty base for Swiss Steak.
Last edited by Red_Robot on Mon May 26, 2014 1:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Red_Robot » Mon May 26, 2014 4:29 am

Also with the advent of barbecue season and in the spirit of sharing, I'm going to throw out one of my favorite quick-and-dirty recipes for impromptu Summer time grilling.

  • 1 16oz. bottle Zesty Italian Dressing (preferably with olive oil)
  • 1 8oz bottle of Steak Sauce
  • 1 12oz bottle of Beer

You can whisk this together in about 30 seconds and it makes a great marinade or mop for steaks or burgers, but works pretty good for chicken or pork too. Happy grilling.
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby 4649matt » Mon May 26, 2014 10:09 am

Red_Robot wrote:
  • 1 16oz. bottle Zesty Italian Dressing (preferably with olive oil)
  • 1 8oz bottle of Steak Sauce
  • 1 12oz bottle of Beer
Happy grilling.


This intrigues me, but I was curious what kind of beer you are referring to?
Are we talking a stout, a lager, an IPA or perhaps a Budweiser... ?

I've never used brine on pork, but it has served wonderfully in my experience with poultry.
Do you have some brine barbecue recipes?
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Re: Running Food Thread

Postby Red_Robot » Mon May 26, 2014 3:31 pm

4649matt wrote:
Red_Robot wrote:
  • 1 12oz bottle of Beer

This intrigues me, but I was curious what kind of beer you are referring to?
Are we talking a stout, a lager, an IPA or perhaps a Budweiser... ?


Oh man...you want to get me talking about beer and barbecue? As if I didn't have enough of a problem with loquaciousness.

The quick-and-dirty (MC's Minute-to-Make) mop is meant to utilize whatever you have readily on hand, or can gather quickly with a trip down to the nearby gas station convenience store. Whatever is sitting in the case on your kitchen floor is perfect for the recipe. Now that being said...if I am gathering ingredients for this beforehand, I usually prefer a red lager. But that is also likely because I like to drink red lager. A good rule of thumb is, if it's the sort of beer you'd like to have with whatever you're cooking, then it would work nicely in the marinade. Just remember the beer makes up a significant percentage of the liquid, and it will make itself known. A light beer is basically just bringing water with a little sourness and salt to the party. A dark stout is going to bring that earthy, malty hoppiness.

Want to add a twist to the classic 50's drive-in burger-and-fries? Make the mop with your favorite dark stout (Like say, chocolate oatmeal stout), broil some burgers on the grill, then top with some caramelized onions, dill pickle slices, mustard, and serve with a side of crinkle cut fries and a chocolate oatmeal stout milkshake. Decadence!

Now, the main reason for brining is to add moisture to a cut of meat. I am a big advocate for brining pork especially if smoking and barbecuing, because it really helps keep your meat moist during the long process of slow cooking. If you can also improve the flavor profile, all the better.

The basic brine is a gallon of water, a cup of salt, and half a cup of sugar. You can leap off from there. Some have a preference for using a noniodized salt, or pickling salt. Others will use brown sugar, or maple syrup, or honey for their sweetener.

Personally, for basic pork barbecuing, I make a brine with 2 quarts of water, a quart of apple juice, and 2/3rds of a cup of kosher salt. I do this to cut back a touch on the salt and sugar. I then add a cup of apple cider vinegar, half a cup of whole black peppercorns, 2 tablespoons of dry sage, 1 tablespoon of white pepper, 1 tablespoon of whole cloves, about 4 bay leaves, and if I think it needs it, a tablespoon of papaya based meat tenderizer. I like using juice or ginger ale for my sweetener because it also adds a little acid, which helps tenderize the meat.

From there you can go crazy. Halve some oranges and limes and add them to the brine. Or add some pineapple juice. If you are using a rub, homemade or purchased, it's never a bad idea to add some to the brine. Just keep in mind most premade pork rubs have a lot of salt so you may need to adjust the amount of salt you add to the brine initially.

The thing about brining is you want the pork to have time to get a good soak, but you don't want to leave it in for too long. The salt in the brine, or the acid if you use it, can cause the meat to start to "cure" or "pickle" if left alone for too long. This isn't a major problem, but it can give the meat a certain "hamminess" or spongey texture. Thin cuts like chops and ribs I don't generally brine for more than a day. Butt and picnic roasts or tenderloins I don't brine for longer than 2 days.

A good alternative and compliment to brining is flavor injecting, and a basic brine can double for an injection easily.
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